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Constitutional & Administrative Law


Question: Royal Prerogatives Year 1, LLB.

Answer: The royal prerogative concerns ‘those inherent legal attributes which are unique to...


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  • Subject: Law
  • Course: Constitutional and Administrative Law
  • Level: Degree
  • Year: 1st
  • Mark: 72%
  • Words: 1739
  • Date submitted: June 17, 2013
  • Date written: Not available
  • References: Yes
  • Document type: Essay*
  • Essay ID: 4866

Question: Has the United Kingdom’s membership of the European Union led to a ‘constitutional revolution’, in causing the abandonment of parliamentary sovereignty?

If so, when did this ‘constitutional revolution’ take place?

Constitutional Law (Public Law) 1st Year, Mark 70%
Undergraduate, Law, Oxford University

Answer: The contention that the United Kingdom’s membership of the European Union (“EU”)...


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  • Subject: Law
  • Course: Constitutional and Administrative Law
  • Level: Degree
  • Year: 1st
  • Mark: 70%
  • Words: 1999
  • Date submitted: May 30, 2016
  • Date written: October, 2014
  • References: Yes
  • Document type: Essay*
  • Essay ID: 7400

Question: It is common to claim that the United Kingdom has a ‘political’ constitution in contrast to the ‘legal’ constitution possessed by other states.

What does this claim entail and has the United Kingdom’s constitution become more or less ‘political’ in recent years?

Constitutional Law (Public Law) 1st Year, Mark 69%
Undergraduate, Law, Oxford University

Answer: The United Kingdom’s constitution can rightly be regarded as predominantly ‘political’ in...


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  • Subject: Law
  • Course: Constitutional and Administrative Law
  • Level: Degree
  • Year: 1st
  • Mark: 69%
  • Words: 1306
  • Date submitted: May 30, 2016
  • Date written: October, 2014
  • References: Yes
  • Document type: Essay*
  • Essay ID: 7401

Question: 'Devolution represents a major change in our political constitution. What has been less apparent is that devolution has also produced important changes to the role of the judiciary in our constitutional arrangements.' Discuss.

Answer: Prior to devolution, the United Kingdom (‘UK’) is probably the most centralised...


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  • Subject: Law
  • Course: Constitutional and Administrative Law
  • Level: Degree
  • Year: 2nd/3rd
  • Mark: 60%
  • Words: 2467
  • Date submitted: March 19, 2015
  • Date written: January, 2014
  • References: Yes
  • Document type: Essay*
  • Essay ID: 6421

Question: CODIFICATION ESSAY
“There are many reasons why the United Kingdom has a largely written, but uncodified, constitution. Those reasons are historical, political, and cultural. It would be impossible to persuade any major political party to ignore those reasons and to work towards the adoption of a codified constitution for the United Kingdom.”

Critically assess this statement.

Answer: The UK does not have a codified constitution, there is no one...


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  • Subject: Law
  • Course: Constitutional and Administrative Law
  • Level: Degree
  • Year: 1st
  • Mark: Not available
  • Words: 2449
  • Date submitted: May 10, 2016
  • Date written: Not available
  • References: No
  • Document type: Essay*
  • Essay ID: 7345

Question: Should Britain abolish the Monarchy?

Answer: The Queen as the possessor of the Crown performs mainly legal and...


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  • Subject: Law
  • Course: Constitutional and Administrative Law
  • Level: Degree
  • Year: 1st
  • Mark: Not available
  • Words: 2672
  • Date submitted: May 10, 2016
  • Date written: Not available
  • References: No
  • Document type: Essay*
  • Essay ID: 7344

Question: Is the rule of law, as enforced by courts, the ultimate controlling factor on which our constitution is based?

Week 4 – Rule of Law

Answer: There was little disagreement when Craig claimed that ‘the rule of law...


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  • Subject: Law
  • Course: Constitutional and Administrative Law
  • Level: Degree
  • Year: 1st
  • Mark: Not available
  • Words: 1211
  • Date submitted: January 07, 2016
  • Date written: March, 2015
  • References: No
  • Document type: Essay*
  • Essay ID: 7051

Question: “There is nothing in any way novel in according supremacy to rules of Community law in those areas to which they apply…” (Lord Bridge in Factortame (No. 2)). Discuss.

Week 3 – Parliamentary Sovereignty

Answer: The use of the word ‘supremacy’ is considered tantamount to ‘Parliamentary sovereignty’....


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  • Subject: Law
  • Course: Constitutional and Administrative Law
  • Level: Degree
  • Year: 1st
  • Mark: Not available
  • Words: 1205
  • Date submitted: January 06, 2016
  • Date written: March, 2015
  • References: No
  • Document type: Essay*
  • Essay ID: 7049

Question: "The judges believe that Parliament, through the Human Rights Act, has given them a special role in protecting rights, particularly perhaps the rights of unpopular minorities. MPs, by contrast, believe that, as elected representatives accountable to the people, it is they and not the judges who should retain the last word on such matters."
V Bogdanor, ‘Imprisoned by a Doctrine: The Modern Defence of Parliamentary Sovereignty' (2012) 32 OJLS 179'

Discuss, with reference to the above quote, whether parliamentary sovereignty is now at threat from the judiciary, citing relevant case-law in your answer.
(64% Constitutional/Administrative Law, Year 1)

Answer: Parliamentary sovereignty is one of the key principles of the British constitution...


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  • Subject: Law
  • Course: Constitutional and Administrative Law
  • Level: Degree
  • Year: 1st
  • Mark: Not available
  • Words: 1409
  • Date submitted: April 29, 2015
  • Date written: Not available
  • References: Yes
  • Document type: Essay*
  • Essay ID: 6505

Question: Is the rule of law the ultimate controlling factor of the British constitution?

Answer: Introduction There are three underlying principles that create the British constitution. They...


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  • Subject: Law
  • Course: Constitutional and Administrative Law
  • Level: Degree
  • Year: 2nd/3rd
  • Mark: Not available
  • Words: 2213
  • Date submitted: February 03, 2015
  • Date written: February, 2014
  • References: Yes
  • Document type: Essay*
  • Essay ID: 6324

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