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Degree Level Essays

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Question: Using evidence from psychological research, critically evaluate the validity of a ‘paranormal’ phenomenon of your choice. 85%

Module: PL2D100 Understanding and Researching Psychology: Cognitive, Biological and Historical Perspectives

Answer: Paranormal phenomenon is a component of parapsychology (Groome, 2016). Parapsychology is the study of paranormal circumstances unexplainable by science as it goes...


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  • Subject: Psychology
  • Course: PL2D100 Understanding and Researching Psychology
  • Level: Degree
  • Year: 2nd/3rd
  • Mark: 85%
  • Words: 2061
  • Date submitted: December 06, 2018
  • Date written: November, 2018
  • References: Yes
  • Document type: Essay*
  • Essay ID: 8577

Question: Critically evaluate the strengths and limitations of the neurodiversity movement. 68%

PL3S148 Embracing Neurodiversity

Answer: Neurodiversity is an emerging field in the world of Psychology that challenges people's perceptions about disabilities (Fenton, 2007). The Neurodiversity Movement encompasses...


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  • Subject: Psychology
  • Course: PL3S148 Embracing Neurodiversity
  • Level: Degree
  • Year: 2nd/3rd
  • Mark: 68%
  • Words: 3028
  • Date submitted: December 05, 2018
  • Date written: November, 2018
  • References: Yes
  • Document type: Essay*
  • Essay ID: 8576

Question: Forensic essay: offender risk assessment and management plan.

Scenario Used
Marcus is a 37-year-old white British male living in Wales. Marcus is currently unemployed and receives Job seekers allowance. He receives no support from his family as he is estranged from them. Since childhood, Marcus has experienced many symptoms such as; auditory hallucinations, distorted cognitions and disorganised thinking. The first indicator of symptoms was evident when Marcus was 16 and destroyed his older step brother’s bedroom as he believed he was ‘inside his head’. Since then Marcus has become well known to the local hospital and social services and has been admitted to hospital on two separate occasions. One of those occasions when Marcus was 26, he reported having believed that cameras were watching him at his work place. These delusional beliefs resulted in Marcus destroying his and 3 other colleague’s computers in an aggressive rant. Police were involved, and he was later hospitalised. On another occasion when Marcus was 29 his roommate reported having come home to find Marcus unconscious after a suicide attempt of taking a cocktail of pain killers and alcohol. Marcus was then hospitalised and admitted having an addiction to alcohol, binge drinking beer and spirits weekly. Approximately 6 months ago, Marcus was detained by police on suspicion of a serious assault; where a local man was stabbed outside a pub and sustained significant injuries. Witnesses have identified a man of Marcus’s description having been excessively drunk at the time of assaulting the man. During the interview after his arrest, Marcus was reserved and seemed to have minimised his symptoms but admitted that the last 12 months leading up to the assault, reported having experienced his symptoms more intense and having been more dependent on alcohol. Marcus was diagnosed with major depressive disorder at age 34 and prescribed medication Prozac at a dosage of 20mg three times a day for depression and pregabalin at a 222mg dosage twice a day for generalised anxiety disorder (GAD). Which Marcus has admitted to not taking regularly. Based on evidence submitted, Marcus has been detained in a secure mental health facility and will be undergoing risk assessment and treatment.

Answer: Summary The following report presents a risk assessment and management plan for Marcus. This is based on classifying Marcus as mentally unstable...


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  • Subject: Psychology
  • Course: Forensic psychology
  • Level: Degree
  • Year: 2nd/3rd
  • Mark: Not available
  • Words: 2557
  • Date submitted: December 05, 2018
  • Date written: November, 2016
  • References: Yes
  • Document type: Essay*
  • Essay ID: 8575

Question: Please comment on the following summary of this ITIF report on mobile zero rating. Critically analyse its content with reference to our course materials.

Information Technology and the Law (IT Law)
LLB Law
Year 2
London School of Economics and Political Science
Essay mark: 66% (2:1)

Mobile Zero Rating: The Economics and Innovation Behind Free Data.
By Doug Brake - May 2016
SUMMARY
Zero-rating programs, which allow consumers to access certain Internet content and services without it counting against their monthly data plans, have proven polarizing, being met with reactions ranging from derision to praise. The crux of the controversy is whether the practice of zero rating violates the spirit of network neutrality principles. Strictly speaking, zero-rated data is treated differently than other data in a way that influences consumer behavior. But adhering to such a strict interpretation of net neutrality would be misguided. Zero-rating products are unlikely to harm the open Internet; instead they are a sign of healthy product differentiation that more efficiently allocates scarce resources in a competitive market, ultimately improving consumer value. The Federal Communications Commission—along with other regulators around the world—is examining zero rating, and while its case-by-case approach to overseeing these programs is sound, telecom regulators should make it clear that they believe nonexclusive zero-rating programs are in the public interest.
Zero rating is being rolled out, by major carriers in the United States and around the world. Zero rating offers a number of benefits.
First, it is good economics to help advance innovation in information technology markets. Where both content or “edge” firms as well as network operators make large investments in establishing platforms that have relatively low marginal costs, and gain value with each additional user, zero rating can help bring new customers into a firm’s customer base, enhancing the value of the product, and providing additional revenues to defray the investment for additional innovation.
Second, zero rating is an important tool to expand access to information, particularly in developing countries. As of 2015, mobile broadband networks covered about 78 percent of the world’s population, but only 43 percent were actually using the Internet. That 35 percent—some 2.5 billion people—who have access to mobile networks, but choose not to subscribe, could be given the opportunity, with zero-rating programs, to connect at a relatively low cost.
Third, zero rating is generally pro-competitive. There is little difference between zero rating and common-place discounts that sellers provide through middlemen that everyone accepts as normal, like toll-free 800 numbers. Zero rating allows for differentiation of company offerings, both at the application layer and between competing carriers. This ability to differentiate services tends to most benefit maverick firms that change the terms on which firms compete, and allows new applications a foothold to get discovered.
Fourth, consumers enjoy zero rating plans, and appreciate the ability to use zero-rated apps without having to worry about their data limits. We should celebrate when competitive markets work to provide consumers more of what they want. Critics argue that zero rating is against the public interest, but the bar for arguing that the public interest directly contravenes consumer preference should be a high one.
Fifth, zero rating programs can lead to more efficient use of networks if they zero-rated services use fewer bits than a non-zero rated version while having essentially no diminution of quality and customer experience.
Lastly, zero rating can help facilitate more efficient advertising, leading to more transactions online, boosting economic growth and adding fuel to continued growth in the advertising supported Internet.
These programs are a win for “edge” video providers, who see more use of their products and services. They are also a win for network operators, who are working to gain market share and explore new business models to meet demand. And most importantly, they are a big win for consumers, who end up getting more for less.

Answer: The big question that arises in net neutrality debate is should we regulate the Internet, or should we not, as zero-rating is...


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  • Subject: Law
  • Course: I.T. and the Law
  • Level: Degree
  • Year: 2nd/3rd
  • Mark: 66%
  • Words: 750
  • Date submitted: December 02, 2018
  • Date written: November, 2018
  • References: Yes
  • Document type: Essay*
  • Essay ID: 8574

Question: Law and the Institutions of European Union Essay
LLB Law 2nd Year
London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE)
Mark graded: 63 (2:1)

“The main purpose of the EU is the management of interdependence. To do this appropriately, power needs to be in the hands of bureaucrats and experts”. Discuss.

Answer: What is the relative power of the European Commission, the Council of Ministers and the European Parliament (EP) in the European Union...


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  • Subject: Law
  • Course: European Union Law
  • Level: Degree
  • Year: 2nd/3rd
  • Mark: 63%
  • Words: 1470
  • Date submitted: December 01, 2018
  • Date written: March, 2018
  • References: Yes
  • Document type: Essay*
  • Essay ID: 8573

Question: Land Law Problem Question Essay
LLB Law 2nd Year
London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE)
Mark graded: 60 (2:1)

In 2014 Astrid, an accountant, bought a one-bedroom flat with an adjoining garage. At that time her girlfriend, Bernice, worked at the estate agents which was selling the flat. By virtue of her position there, Bernice was able to secure for Astrid a £2,000 discount on the purchase price of the property. In 2016, Bernice gave up her job at the estate agents’ in order to pursue a career as a musician; since then, she has spent a significant portion of each year on tour. When not on tour, Bernice spends some of her time staying with friends and between five and eight months of each year with Astrid. Bernice makes no contributions to the mortgage, though once, after a successful tour, she gave Astrid £1,000 which Astrid chose to use to pay off some of the mortgage loan. 


Earlier this year, while Bernice was on a lengthy tour abroad, Astrid decided to make a cash sale of the flat to Craig, a friend of a friend. Craig, who had recently benefited from an inheritance, was about to begin working nearby and wanted to buy a property quickly. When Craig inspected the flat he found an array of musical instruments in the bedroom and the living area. Craig said to Astrid: “You must be a very creative accountant!” Astrid didn’t respond. In the bedroom Craig noticed two toothbrushes, women’s clothes, jewellery and toiletries. In the garage there was a car and a motorbike. “Does anyone live here with you?”, Craig asked Astrid. She replied: “there’s someone who stays with me sometimes but it would be stretching things to say they live here. I bought the flat, and it’s mine to sell. If you’ve any doubts, check the Land Register.” Craig checked with the Land Registry and, discovering that Astrid was sole legal title-holder to the property and that there were no interests registered against the title, decided he would buy the flat.

This week, just as the conveyance of the flat from Astrid to Craig was to be completed, Bernice returned from tour. When Astrid told her of the sale to Craig, Bernice said it couldn’t go ahead. “I occupy this flat. I reckon I’ve got property rights, and I’ve certainly got human rights!” 


Advise Bernice.

Answer: In this scenario, we can discern that Astrid according to the orthodox are recognized as sole legal title to the property. However,...


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  • Subject: Law
  • Course: Land Law
  • Level: Degree
  • Year: 2nd/3rd
  • Mark: 60%
  • Words: 1291
  • Date submitted: November 30, 2018
  • Date written: March, 2018
  • References: Yes
  • Document type: Essay*
  • Essay ID: 8572

Question: Unit 137 – Understand children and young person’s development

1.1 Explain the sequence and rate of each aspect of development that would normally be expected 
in children and young people from birth – 19 years
1.2 Analyse the difference between sequence of development and rate of development and why 
the distinction is important
1.3 Analyse the reasons why children and young people’s development may not follow the pattern normally expected.

2.1 Analyse how children and young people’s development is influenced by a range of personal 
factors
2.2 Analyse how children and young people’s development is influenced by a range of external 
factors
2.3 Explain how theories of development and frameworks to support development influence current practice.

3.1 Analyse the importance of early identification of development delay
3.2 Explain the potential risks of late recognition of development delay
3.3 Evaluate how multiagency teams work together to support all aspects of development in children and young people
3.4 Explain how play and leisure activities can be used to support all aspects of development of children and young people.

4.1 Explain how different types of transitions can affect children and young people’s development
4.2 Explain the importance of children and young people having positive relationships through periods of transition
4.3 Evaluate the effectiveness of positive relationships on children and young people’s development.

5.1 Explain different methods of assessing, recording and monitoring children and young people’s 
development
5.2 Explain how and in what circumstances different methods for assessing, recording and 
monitoring children and young people’s development in the work setting
5.3 Explain how different types of interventions can promote positive outcomes for children and young people where development is not following the pattern normally expected
5.4 Evaluate the importance of accurate documentation regarding the development of children and young people.

Answer: 1,3 Children encounter issues in their lives that may have a positive or negative influence on their lives this may derail them...


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  • Subject: Health and Social Care
  • Course: Health and Social Care
  • Level: Further Education
  • Year: Not applicable
  • Mark: Not available
  • Words: 7284
  • Date submitted: November 28, 2018
  • Date written: Not available
  • References: No
  • Document type: Essay*
  • Essay ID: 8571

Question: Unit 145 Promote professional development

1.1 Explain the importance of continually improving knowledge and practice
1.2 Analyse potential barriers to professional development
1.3 Compare the use of different sources and support for professional development
1.4 Explain factors to consider when selecting opportunities and activities for keeping knowledge and practice up to date

2.1 Evaluate own knowledge and performance against standards and benchmarks

4.1 Compare models of reflective practice
4.2 Explain the importance of reflective practice to improve performance
4.4, 4.4a, 4.4b

Answer: 2.1 As a professional in childcare, and owner of a childcare setting I consider it vital within my role to continue with...


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  • Subject: Health and Social Care
  • Course: Health and Social Care
  • Level: Further Education
  • Year: Not applicable
  • Mark: Not available
  • Words: 3215
  • Date submitted: November 27, 2018
  • Date written: Not available
  • References: No
  • Document type: Essay*
  • Essay ID: 8570

Question: Unit 206: The role of the health and social care worker

Ai. Explain how a working relationship is different from a personal relationship.
Aii Describe the different working relationships in a health and social care setting.
Aiii Explain why it is important to work in partnership with others.
Aiv identify ways of working that can help improve partnership working.
AV Identify skills and approaches when dealing with conflict.
Avi Explain how and when to access support about Partnership working and Resolving conflicts

Bi outline what is meant by agreed ways of working.
Bii explain the importance of full and up-to-date details of agreed ways of working
Biii Explain why it is important to work within the agreed scope of the job role.

Answer: Ai. We all have a variety of relationships with different people through out our lives. Depending on when we meet them and...


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  • Subject: Health and Social Care
  • Course: Health and Social Care
  • Level: Further Education
  • Year: Not applicable
  • Mark: Not available
  • Words: 2502
  • Date submitted: November 27, 2018
  • Date written: Not available
  • References: No
  • Document type: Essay*
  • Essay ID: 8569

Question: TMA 06 Option 6 Identify two groups of children or young people who are ‘at the margins’ of educational and / or community life and discuss the processes that marginalize them. These might be real groups that you know or work with, or groups you identified in Unit 16-18. Evaluate some of the schemes intended to promote their inclusions and / or address their exclusion.

E214 Equality, participation and inclusion: learning from each other

Answer: Mainstream Schools are structured to accommodate the Curriculums designed for pupils that have no special needs; however, over the last few decades,...


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  • Subject: Children and Young People
  • Course: E214 Equality, participation and inclusion: learning from each other
  • Level: Degree
  • Year: 2nd/3rd
  • Mark: Not available
  • Words: 1938
  • Date submitted: November 24, 2018
  • Date written: Not available
  • References: No
  • Document type: Essay*
  • Essay ID: 8568

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