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Question: What functions do the Kidney’s carry out?

Answer: The kidneys are central to homeostatic regulation. They excrete soluble waste, help...


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  • Subject: Biology
  • Course: Biology
  • Level: A-Level
  • Year: Not applicable
  • Mark: 60%
  • Words: 1161
  • Date submitted: March 16, 2009
  • Date written: Not available
  • References: No
  • Document type: Essay*
  • Essay ID: 1002

Question: The Effect of pH on the Rate of Catalase

Answer: Catalase is an enzyme. All enzymes are proteins, made up of a...


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  • Subject: Biology
  • Course: Biology
  • Level: A-Level
  • Year: Not applicable
  • Mark: 60%
  • Words: 1407
  • Date submitted: March 16, 2009
  • Date written: Not available
  • References: Yes
  • Document type: Essay*
  • Essay ID: 998

Question: Minority parties in Britain call for electoral reform whereas the two major parties tend to favour retaining the existing system. Do you consider that the strengths of proportional representation outweigh the advantages of simple majority voting?

Answer: Electoral reform in Britain is an issue that has dogged politics for...


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  • Subject: Politics
  • Course: Politics
  • Level: A-Level
  • Year: Not applicable
  • Mark: 60%
  • Words: 1646
  • Date submitted: February 26, 2009
  • Date written: Not available
  • References: Yes
  • Document type: Essay*
  • Essay ID: 807

Question: Macbeth practice exam question: not timed

Read the following extract from Act 1, Scene 7 and then answer the question that follows. At this point in the play Macbeth and Lady Macbeth are in conversation. Macbeth has just informed Lady Macbeth that he does not think they should kill Duncan.

Starting with this extract, write about how Shakespeare presents masculinity in the play. Write about:
•how Shakespeare presents masculinity in this conversation
•how Shakespeare presents masculinity in the play as a whole.


LADY MACBETH
Glamis thou art, and Cawdor, and shalt be
What thou art promised; yet do I fear thy nature, It is too full o’th’milk of human kindness
To catch the nearest way. Thou wouldst be great, Art not without ambition, but without
The illness should attend it. What thou wouldst highly, That wouldst thou holily; wouldst not play false,
And yet wouldst wrongly win. Thou’dst have, great Glamis, That which cries, ‘Thus thou must do’ if thou have it; And that which rather thou dost fear to do,
Than wishest should be undone. Hie thee hither, That I may pour my spirits in thine ear
And chastise with the valour of my tongue
All that impedes thee from the golden round, Which fate and metaphysical aid doth seem To have thee crowned withal.

Answer: Shakespeare presents masculinity in Macbeth as being a noble and honourable compliment....


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  • Subject: English Literature
  • Course: English Literature
  • Level: A-Level
  • Year: Not applicable
  • Mark: Not available
  • Words: 1041
  • Date submitted: October 25, 2019
  • Date written: Not available
  • References: No
  • Document type: Essay*
  • Essay ID: 8751

Question: Macbeth practice exam question: not timed

Read the following extract from Act 1 Scene 5 of Macbeth and then answer the question that follows. At this point in the play, Lady Macbeth is speaking. She has just read Macbeth’s letter telling her about his meeting with the three witches.

Starting with this speech, explore how Shakespeare presents ambition in Macbeth. Write about:
• how Shakespeare presents ambition in this speech
• how Shakespeare presents ambition in the play as a whole.
[30 marks] AO4 [4 marks]


LADY MACBETH
Glamis thou art, and Cawdor, and shalt be
What thou art promised; yet do I fear thy nature, It is too full o’th’milk of human kindness
To catch the nearest way. Thou wouldst be great, Art not without ambition, but without
The illness should attend it. What thou wouldst highly, That wouldst thou holily; wouldst not play false,
And yet wouldst wrongly win. Thou’dst have, great Glamis, That which cries, ‘Thus thou must do’ if thou have it; And that which rather thou dost fear to do,
Than wishest should be undone. Hie thee hither, That I may pour my spirits in thine ear
And chastise with the valour of my tongue
All that impedes thee from the golden round, Which fate and metaphysical aid doth seem To have thee crowned withal.

Answer: Shakespeare presents ambition as an insatiable trait, which though in the beginning...


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  • Subject: English Literature
  • Course: English Literature
  • Level: A-Level
  • Year: Not applicable
  • Mark: Not available
  • Words: 1179
  • Date submitted: October 25, 2019
  • Date written: Not available
  • References: No
  • Document type: Essay*
  • Essay ID: 8750

Question: Macbeth practice exam questions: not timed

Starting with the extract of Act 1 Scene 3, how does Shakespeare present attitudes towards duty?
- How Shakespeare presents attitudes towards duty in this extract
- How Shakespeare presents attitudes to duty in the play as a whole

Answer: Shakespeare presents duty in Macbeth as a destructive sense of responsibility which,...


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  • Subject: English Literature
  • Course: English Literature
  • Level: A-Level
  • Year: Not applicable
  • Mark: Not available
  • Words: 894
  • Date submitted: October 25, 2019
  • Date written: Not available
  • References: No
  • Document type: Essay*
  • Essay ID: 8749

Question: Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde essays
Question: Read the following extract from Chapter 7 and then answer the question that follows. In this extract Mr Utterson and Mr Enfield catch sight of Dr Jekyll at his window.

Starting with this extract, how does Stevenson present Jekyll’s unusual behaviour?
• how Stevenson presents Jekyll’s unusual behaviour in this extract
• how Stevenson presents Jekyll’s unusual behaviour in the novella as a whole.


Extract: The court was very cool and a little damp, and full of premature twilight, although the sky, high up overhead, was still bright with sunset. The middle one of the three windows were half-way open; and sitting close beside it, taking the air with an infinite sadness of mien, like some disconsolate prisoner, Utterson saw Dr Jekyll.
"What! Jekyll!" he cried. "I trust you are better."
"I am very low, Utterson," replied the doctor drearily, "very low. It will not last long, thank God."
"You stay too much indoors," said the lawyer. "You should be out, whipping up the circulation like Mr. Enfield and me. (This is my cousin--Mr. Enfield--Dr Jekyll.) Come now; get your hat and take a quick turn with us."
"You are very good," sighed the other. "I should like to very much; but no, no, no, it is quite impossible; I dare not. But indeed, Utterson, I am very glad to see you; this is really a great pleasure; I would ask you and Mr. Enfield up, but the place is really not fit."
"Why, then," said the lawyer, good-naturedly, "the best thing we can do is to stay down here and speak with you from where we are."
"That is just what I was about to venture to propose," returned the doctor with a smile. But the words were hardly uttered, before the smile was struck out of his face and succeeded by an expression of such abject terror and despair, as froze the very blood of the two gentlemen below. They saw it but for a glimpse for the window was instantly thrust down; but that glimpse had been sufficient, and they turned and left the court without a word. In silence, too, they traversed the by-street; and it was not until they had come into a neighbouring thoroughfare, where even upon a Sunday there were still some stirrings of life, that Mr. Utterson at last turned and looked at his companion. They were both pale; and there was an answering horror in their eyes.
"God forgive us, God forgive us," said Mr. Utterson.
But Mr. Enfield only nodded his head very seriously, and walked on once more in silence.

Answer: Stevenson portrays unusual behaviour throughout the novella by infiltrating motifs of concealment...


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  • Subject: English Literature
  • Course: English Literature
  • Level: A-Level
  • Year: Not applicable
  • Mark: Not available
  • Words: 1012
  • Date submitted: October 25, 2019
  • Date written: Not available
  • References: No
  • Document type: Essay*
  • Essay ID: 8748

Question: Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde essay
Read the following extract from Chapter 6 and then answer the question that follows. In this extract Mr Utterson visits Dr Lanyon and is shocked at his ill appearance.

Starting with this extract, how does Stevenson use the characters of Lanyon and Utterson to present ideas about Victorian morality? Write about:
• How Stevenson uses Lanyon to present morality in this extract
• How Stevenson uses the characters of Lanyon and Utterson to present ideas about Victorian morality in the novel as a whole.
[30 marks]

Extract: Lanyon had his death-warrant written legibly upon his face. The rosy man had grown pale; his flesh had fallen away; he was visibly balder and older; and yet it was not so much these tokens of a swift physical decay that arrested the lawyer's notice, as a look in the eye and quality of manner that seemed to testify to some deep-seated terror of the mind. It was unlikely that the doctor should fear death; and yet that was what Utterson was tempted to suspect. "Yes," he thought; "he is a doctor, he must know his own state and that his days are counted; and the knowledge is more than he can bear." And yet when Utterson remarked on his ill-looks, it was with an air of greatness that Lanyon declared himself a doomed man.
"I have had a shock," he said, "and I shall never recover. It is a question of weeks. Well, life has been pleasant; I liked it; yes, sir, I used to like it. I sometimes think if we knew all, we should be gladder to get away." "Jekyll is ill, too," observed Utterson. "Have you seen him?"
But Lanyon's face changed, and he held up a trembling hand. "I wish to see or hear no more of Dr. Jekyll," he said in a loud, unsteady voice. "I am quite done with that person; and I beg that you will spare me any allusion to one whom I regard as dead."
"Tut-tut," said Mr. Utterson; and then after a considerable pause, "Can't I do anything?" he inquired. "We are three very old friends, Lanyon; we shall not live to make others."
"Nothing can be done," returned Lanyon; "ask himself."
"He will not see me," said the lawyer.
"I am not surprised at that," was the reply. "Someday, Utterson, after I am dead, you may perhaps come to learn the right and wrong of this. I cannot tell you. And in the meantime, if you can sit and talk with me of other things, for God's sake, stay and do so; but if you cannot keep clear of this accursed topic, then, in God's name, go, for I cannot bear it."

Answer: Stevenson presents moral obligation in the Victorian era as a repressive and...


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  • Subject: English Literature
  • Course: English Literature
  • Level: A-Level
  • Year: Not applicable
  • Mark: Not available
  • Words: 984
  • Date submitted: October 25, 2019
  • Date written: Not available
  • References: No
  • Document type: Essay*
  • Essay ID: 8747

Question: 'Evaluate the argument that there are more advantages of having a codified constitution than remaining with an uncodified constitution' [30].

Answer: A codified constitution is a single document outlining the main principles of...


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  • Subject: Politics
  • Course: Politics
  • Level: A-Level
  • Year: Not applicable
  • Mark: Not available
  • Words: 1305
  • Date submitted: May 27, 2019
  • Date written: March, 2019
  • References: No
  • Document type: Essay*
  • Essay ID: 8678

Question: Evaluate the view that the conventions of ministerial responsibility no longer account for ministerial actions.

Answer: Given the uncodified nature of the constitution, the British cabinet system of...


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  • Subject: Politics
  • Course: Politics
  • Level: A-Level
  • Year: Not applicable
  • Mark: Not available
  • Words: 979
  • Date submitted: May 27, 2019
  • Date written: March, 2019
  • References: No
  • Document type: Essay*
  • Essay ID: 8677

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